Very often I consider letting this weird little corner of the internet lapse and am held off from doing it out of habit or the occasional kind word from some fellow in the Presbyterian Church I never would have thought would get something out of it.

But I realised yesterday that the great value in Creideamh.ie/Zoomtard.com is not actually the content I offer but the fact that a couple of very smart people hang around here.

I made a post about Alister McGrath last week. It was a typical Zoomtard post in that it was more instinct than thought-through and just an attempt to capture a thought for further introspection in the future. Comments erupted. They were of an incredibly insightful standard but without prejudicing the other regular commentators let me just pick out Morberts response:

I remember when McGrath visited Maynooth. I expected to be “at odds” with his views, but ended up rooting for him (and the other guests) as they were barraged by assertions from Christians who supported Intelligent Design, and wanted to see the methodological naturalism of science subverted. This might indicate why he is not always popular. McGrath is good at reining natural theology. He believes it should serve to strengthen Christianity directly, as opposed to weaken atheism (Which is what natural theologians like William Lane Craig try to use it as.). Perhaps this more conservative view of natural theology is unpopular. Also, “The Twilight of Atheism”, while largely about the history of atheism, was a little… ambitious.

FC, as an atheist, I wouldn’t try to demonstrate that your religious experiences weren’t genuine. But at the same time they aren’t a problem for atheism. Problems of experience in general, like the p-zombie problem, are much more relevant to the consistency and validity of atheism.

I have read fairly widely around natural theology. I have written essays that have gotten reasonable grades. And yet I have never had anyone draw out the great flaw in contemporary natural theology as effectively as Morbert, a man who is not a Christian, does here.

When he writes:

He believes it should serve to strengthen Christianity directly, as opposed to weaken atheism (Which is what natural theologians like William Lane Craig try to use it as.).

I suspect he would even be able to teach Karl Barth something new. Since the rise of Schleiermacher and all those German theologians we call liberal, natural theology has had a distinctively apologetic tone. But the apology has really been quite passive aggressive. What is refreshing about McGrath is that his approach is not an attempt to prove others wrong but an incitement for Christians to think more deeply, worship more fully and revel in the natural world.

So although Zoomtard is definitely on a road to obsolescence, I think I’ll delay it as long as possible for the sake of what I learn from the commentators.

Your Correspondent, A puppy committed suicide after he saw his bathroom!

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